Mallorca, Spain

We hopped on a morning flight out of Barcelona (for just 17 Euros via Ryanair…no joke!) and a mere 25 minutes later we found ourselves on the Mediterranean island of Mallorca. This is one instance where renting a car can change your entire experience. We highly recommend it to give you the freedom to explore the whole island (you can drive clear across it in a little over an hour!), as public transport takes much longer to get from one place to the other. We set off from the Palma airport in a black Mini Cooper to the charming town of Sóller to check in to Hotel Salvia, our home for the next few days.
/
The nineteenth century mansion turned boutique hotel is nestled in the center of historic downtown Sóller. This is a town to spend leisurely days getting lost along narrow cobblestone streets, snacking on seafood tapas, and browsing through the numerous local markets and shops. The hotel has 7 stunning suites with breathtaking views of the surrounding Tramuntana mountain range and their perfectly-tended grounds. Mallorca is a place with endless natural beauty and numerous things to see, but we could have never left the hotel and been perfectly content. On certain days, you can get a taste of traditional Mallorcan, Spanish and Mediterranean dishes at the hotel’s restaurant, The Salvia Restaurant. Our poolside breakfasts were delicious with local fruits, yogurt, pastries, and meats. The owners, Patrick and Sasha, have done an impeccable job at creating a dream-like island oasis and offer the best tips and personal service to guests. Whether you are there for relaxation or adventure, they will help to create your perfect Mallorcan experience! Check out their availability today! 
The region just outside Sóller has rolling hills dotted with lemon and orange orchards. You can take a vintage tram from the town down to the stunning Port of Sóller which has a perfect beach in a horseshoe bay. We noticed that most towns on the island have the town center inland, and then have a separate port on the coast. We thought this was odd until learning that it was done to help better protect the Mallorcan towns from African pirates (fun fact of the day)!
/
After lounging around the hotel and soaking up the beautiful views, we set off in the Mini Cooper for Port de Sa Calobra in the north. Little did we know, hundreds of cyclists would be joining us on the incredibly steep and windy roads. We thought surely there must be some sort of race happening, the number of bikes on the road with us was overwhelming! We later learned that Mallorca is a hot spot for cyclists to train for the Tour de France due to the similarity in terrain, so the roads are often like that. Drivers, beware! These were undoubtedly the most difficult driving conditions we’ve ever experienced. We’re confident that it shaved several years off our lives – between trying to follow the directions (without wifi), not hitting any cyclists, trying to pass groups of cyclists without being rammed by a tour bus barreling around the corner on the other side of the road, being flipped off countless times by cars angrily zooming past us and making she we didn’t drive off the steep cliffs around every bend. WHEW, getting stressed out again just writing about it!
/
It was all worth it though when we arrived at each beautiful beach. The colors of the Mediterranean quickly filled up our memory cards, we couldn’t get enough of the cobalt and aqua blue waters. Unfortunately, many businesses were still not open because it was a bit early in the season (things liven up again in May) but we actually didn’t mind because it meant not as many tourists! Our second day we drove south through the green flat lands and farms to Es Trenc Beach and Cala Santanyi Beach where we soaked up the sun on white sand beaches, dangled our feet off jagged cliff edges, and jammed to Spanish radio in the Mini.
/
All in all we would definitely recommend more time than 2-3 days on the Island, there is so much to see and each town and beach is different. The main language spoken on the Island is Catalan, but you will be just fine getting around using Spanish or English. German is also widely spoken on the island since it is a huge tourist destination for Germany.
/